Biology

New strategies for killing antibiotic-resistant pathogens

September 22, 2019

A deadly, antibiotic-resistant bacterium can be sterilized by hijacking its haem-acquisition system, which is essential for its survival. The new strategy, developed by Nagoya University researchers and colleagues in Japan, was published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dangerous bacterium that causes infections in hospital settings and in people with weakened […]

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A new electrical equipment can help overcome baldness

September 22, 2019

Millions of hair loss sufferers around the world can reverse this condition with non-invasive and cost-effective electrical techniques that can stimulate hair growth. This technology stimulates the scalp with low-frequency electrical impulses that can suppress sleep follicles to continue hair production.

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Biologists find striking similarities between human and archaeal chromosomes

September 20, 2019

The researchers first discovered similarities between the chromosome organization in humans and archaea. This finding could support the use of archaea in research to understand human diseases related to errors in cellular gene expression, such as cancer. Such grouping of DNA in humans and archaeal chromosomes is important because some genes are activated or deactivated […]

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Researchers are studying key components in bacteria

September 20, 2019

A protective protein that can detect newly-made incomplete and hence potentially toxic protein chains in higher cells is found to have a relative in bacteria. There, the protein also plays a central role in quality control which ensures that defective proteins are degraded.

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Synthetic cells capture and reveal hidden messages from the immune system

September 18, 2019

When immune cells detect harmful pathogens or cancer, they mobilise and coordinate a competent defence response. To do this effectively immune cells must communicate in a way that is tailored to the pathogenic insult. Consequently, the body’s response to various health challenges depends on successful coordination among the cells of the immune system.

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Researchers are solving the cancer causing mechanism of E. coli toxin using a synthetic biological approach

September 17, 2019

While human gut microbes like E. coli help digest food and regulate our immune system, they also contain toxins that could arrest cell cycle and eventually cause cell death. Scientists have long known that colibactin a genotoxin produced by E. coli, can induce DNA double-strand breaks in eukaryotic cells and increase the risk of colorectal […]

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Scientists are finding new ways to test for drug-resistant infections

September 15, 2019

Beta-lactam antibiotics (such as penicillin) are one of the most important classes of antibiotics, but resistance to them has grown to such an extent that doctors often avoid prescribing them in favour of stronger drugs. Scientists from the University of York modified an antibiotic from the beta-lactam family so that it can be attached to […]

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This drug can accelerate recovery of the blood system after chemotherapy, radiation

September 11, 2019

A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem cells after exposure to radiation. If the results can be replicated in humans, the compound could help people recover quicker from chemotherapy, radiation and bone marrow transplants.

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Fluorescent dyes with a single atomic switch

September 10, 2019

It only took the replacement of one atom for Rice University scientists to give new powers to biocompatible fluorescent molecules. The Rice lab of chemist Han Xiao reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society it has developed a single atom switch to turn fluorescent dyes used in biological imaging on and off at […]

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Major environmental challenge as microplastics are harming our drinking water

September 10, 2019

Plastics in our waste streams are breaking down into tiny particles, causing potentially catastrophic consequences for human health and our aquatic systems, finds research from the University of Surrey and Deakin’s Institute for Frontier Materials.

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